Math and games

Origami, folding paper into fascinating shapes and recognizable objects, is a form of gaming.  Now, computation geometry is being used to help folders perfect their origami creations.

Mathematics has long been the secret ingredient to games.  Many players don’t even know they are dealing with math, but it is often there nevertheless.  Did you know “Candy Crush” is a hard mathematics problem?

Really, mathematics is necessary in all kinds of video games ranging from complex simulations involving logistics to casino games, often requiring difficult statistical verification before release — to insure that the game does not bankrupt the house.

Even my games “Microsurgeon” and “Truckin'” relied on a number of decisions and logistics — highly related to mathematics — in order to save a patient or make cargo deliveries on time.  Speaking of logistics, “Tetris” is probably the most famous video game related to selecting shapes into rows in order to score points.

But did you know that packing your bags or Amazon packing your order is a logistics problem too?  If you find this kind of thing fascinating, as I do, you might like my upcoming video game.  More on that soon.

In the meantime, if you haven’t tried it already, you might like my game “Family Tree Solitaire“.  Since one hand’s score in the tree is connected to another hand’s score in the tree, there is mathematics behind the scene.  But all you really need to do is just enjoy playing.  It’s free.