Justice math

FiveThirtyEight, the site that uses statistical analysis to publish reports on a variety of subjects including politics, runs a mathematics puzzle column each week called “The Riddler“.  I enjoy trying to solve these problems, as well as working through puzzling equations — often brilliantly solved by very bright teenagers around the world — on Brilliant.org.

Math continues to be a lifetime joy for me, but it’s also incredibly useful.  The future heavily depends on a variety of computations, including self-driving cars, satellites and solar sails, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and personal robotics.

And, yes, even Supreme Court decisions which make future law related to all kinds of systems that are based in statistics and math.  But do Supreme Court justices understand the math?  Do they need or want to?  FiveThirtyEight posted a thought-provoking article on the subject recently.

Today, high-powered computer systems are being used to solve or explore a variety of mathematical problems.  The video below takes a look at what’s being done with computers and math in relation to gerrymandering.

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