A Penny for your Thoughts

MIT Technology Review writes recently about how “scientists can read a bird’s brain and predict its next song“.  Extrapolating, the scientists hope to be able to use this knowledge to further inventions that might help humans with disabilities communicate.

But it might also lead to the ability to text straight from our thoughts.  This is just a part of what I wrote about in my sci-fi short story “A Penny for your Thoughts” in my e-book anthology “Science Fiction: Time Travel and Robots 2“, where a future technology also allows participants to communicate their feelings over a network connection.  I just thought — pun intended — that if you are interested in this research, you might enjoy reading my story.

Justice math

FiveThirtyEight, the site that uses statistical analysis to publish reports on a variety of subjects including politics, runs a mathematics puzzle column each week called “The Riddler“.  I enjoy trying to solve these problems, as well as working through puzzling equations — often brilliantly solved by very bright teenagers around the world — on Brilliant.org.

Math continues to be a lifetime joy for me, but it’s also incredibly useful.  The future heavily depends on a variety of computations, including self-driving cars, satellites and solar sails, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and personal robotics.

And, yes, even Supreme Court decisions which make future law related to all kinds of systems that are based in statistics and math.  But do Supreme Court justices understand the math?  Do they need or want to?  FiveThirtyEight posted a thought-provoking article on the subject recently.

Today, high-powered computer systems are being used to solve or explore a variety of mathematical problems.  The video below takes a look at what’s being done with computers and math in relation to gerrymandering.

Bygone games

We’ve all heard about jobs lost to robots, but what about games?

A motion video game like “Kids on Site” (Sega CD and PC 1995) — which I worked on — may not be of interest to children in the near future.  Heck, they may not even understand why anyone would have ever been interested in driving a construction vehicle.  Built Robotics is inventing a self-driving track loader.  It may not be long before other automated construction vehicles are created.

Then there’s my old game “Truckin'” (Imagic 1983), where one or two players drive a truck around the country to compete for time and picking up loads.  Between the work being done on automating truck driving and the work on truck logistics (FleetBoard), how long will it be before there aren’t any kids who hunger for driving a big rig on the open road?  Will they even know that people used to drive them?  It’s a strange thought that someday a young researcher will be looking through genealogy records and wonder what it means that their ancestor was a ‘truck driver’.

I could always make a game about fixing robot trucks and robot loaders.  Well, actually, I did just release a game called “Pack A Truck” where the human player loads up a truck using robot remote controls.  Jobs move on, and so do games.

Back from Hawaii

Creativity requires energy and diversity, two things you get from taking a break and seeing new places.  This year we chose Hawaii at the end of summer.  We loved it!

Whether you’re exploring new tastes,

or hiking to red sand and black sand beaches,

or catching a glimpse of a perfect tropical waterfall,

or standing behind one,

or viewing hot lava,

or finding a secluded shore,

or even playing your favorite sport with an incredible view of Molokai island in the background (I made birdie on hole #4 by the way! — just follow the red line),

It all makes for a memorable vacation and energizes one’s creative spirit.