Robot reflections

Will robots learn to be compassionate and creative, or will they learn to kill?  Perhaps both, but I greatly prefer to be chased by an empathic robot.

Elon Musk — CEO of SpaceX and Tesla — has called for a ban on use of killer robots.  More specifically, autonomous robots that can kill without a human in the decision-making process.  But what happens if some countries decide to develop autonomous killer robots, while other countries decide not to?  Negotiating a ban on killer robots worldwide sounds like a good idea, but killer drones can probably be made fairly small.  How does the United Nations or other enforcing group insure that nobody is actually making such machines undercover?  If a nanobot were to be weaponized, it could be almost undetectable!

As a video games designer, I would vastly prefer that robots were used to bring joy into people’s lives.  Some robots are currently learning to play and become experts at several board, card, and video games.  Other robots can play a bit of table tennis, soccer, and other sports.  Let’s have a worldwide robot Olympics where robot teams compete in video games, baseball, tennis, and other sports.  Maybe even against humans.  A much nicer way to decide which country has the better programmers and robot scientists and algorithms.

And why can’t robots be compassionate too?  Okay, that’s a difficult thing to put into AI right now.  But it seems like a good goal.  The robots below probably don’t have any empathy yet, but they sure know how to make me smile.  If you enjoy robot stories, you may be interested in my e-book anthologies “Science Fiction: Robots & Cyborgs” and “Science Fiction: Time Travel and Robots 2”.

More on “Pack A Truck” game

I’ve been busy this week putting my new game “Pack A Truck” on more stores for more devices.  You can now find “Pack A Truck” on the following stores or on the web.  Soon it will be on Amazon as well for both the Android version and a PC Standalone version (for Windows XP and more recent Windows operating systems).

Itch.io (web version of Pack A Truck) – requires a browser like Chrome, Firefox, or Microsoft Edge that supports WebGL

Google Play Store (Android version for phones and tablets)

Microsoft Windows Store (runs on Windows 10, and 8.1 I think)

 

 

My latest video game, “Pack A Truck”

Those of you who are familiar with my classic game “Truckin'”, know that I have an interest in logistics — management and coordination of a complex operation, such as the transport of goods.  My new video game “Pack a Truck” takes a closer look at the specific activity of preparing to move.

It’s more of an arcade game than a simulation, but it does give players food for thought in geometric terms.  Think of each game as a puzzle of sorts, with many combinations of the packing items possible.

So far, I’ve published “Pack a Truck” as an app on the Google Play Store.  If you have an Android phone or tablet, you should be able to install it from there.  I will be working on Windows and WebGL releases soon and possibly other device support.

Classic video games and silent films

What do class video games and silent films have in common?  They started an industry.  As a video games developer going back to the 1970’s, I have long been fascinated with this comparison.  My interest was rekindled upon seeing this online entry about “A Bookshelf of Silent Film Memoirs & Biographies“.

I wondered if anyone had blogged about a similar collection for video game memoirs & biographies.  Sure enough, just do a search on Google or Bing for “video game developer memoirs” and you’ll find several video game memoirs.  Of course, there are many such stories in gamer magazines online and in print as well.

It’s now over 40 years since video games came into our homes, and just like silent films were eclipsed by talkies, classic video games have been relegated to history by many successful modern games and apps.  But there will always be movie lovers who enjoy researching and watching (or re-watching) silent films.  So, it shouldn’t be surprising to find that many video game players today enjoy researching and playing classic video games.

Perhaps video game developers from the past don’t always have the dramatic and romantic stories of silent film stars of old.  But just as the history of silent films has been honored in such movies as “The Artist”, video game developers and history are being remembered in films such as the upcoming “Ready Player One”.