Artificial Intelligence is tops at Go

MIT Technology Review reports on how AlphaGo defeated the top human Go player in the world.  Now A.I. researchers are looking at even more complex games, like StarCraft.  It is interesting to note that StarCraft AI currently has over 60 bots listed.

It will be interesting to see if new bots take advantage of input speed — faster than humanly possible — or match human speed and test their creative and planning skills instead.  If we’re talking about a military bot in a simulated environment, perhaps the bot won’t limit input speed or any other factor.  After all, in the real world a bot will take advantage of whatever it can — like in Terminator.  But if we’re talking about strictly a test of intelligence, it would seem to me that is more important to limit input speed to human capable speed, thus testing pure intellect — creativity, craftiness, planning, team building, etc.
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Captain?

We already have Siri, Cortana, and Alexa — as well as Google Assistant, which doesn’t seem to be a name at all.  But Yahoo has now introduced an assistant named Captain.

Captain?  That’s the best they could come up with?  I mean, do I really want to ask, “Captain, please set a reminder for my daughter’s birthday on Monday.”  Captain?

I don’t know about you, but I don’t have anybody named Captain, nor do I have anybody of the rank Captain, in my house or my office.

Also, while there have been some terrific captains in history and in fiction, there have also been some awful ones.  Captain Ahab, Captain Queeg, and Captain Bligh are just a few I can think of.

The name Captain just doesn’t work for me.

Fully Rigged Ship clip art

Why does “Star Trek: Discovery” look like “Star Wars”?

The “Star Trek” movies in recent years have had spectacular effects, and some have been enjoyable films.  But they mostly benefit from characters that already exist, just reimagined a bit, and they are very limited by the two hour film format.

I want the new “Star Trek: Discovery” television series to have solid stories, characterizations, acting, and writing with interesting science fiction themes.   I feel that is what made the best episodes of the old “Star Trek” shows.

When I looked at the latest photo of the upcoming “Star Trek: Discovery” series, I immediately thought that it looked like some cross between the latest “Star Trek” movies and “Star Wars” movies.  Personally, I don’t want this new series to be like either one of those.

Maybe it is just a stylized image that the producers wanted to use to excite potential viewers.  For me, it just looks like another pretty book cover created to try and make me like what’s inside.  I hope I’m wrong.  I really hope so.  Because anything with the “Star Trek” name has a lot to live up to.  The show’s trailer doesn’t reveal much either, just more gloss — and, of course, Klingons.

Keyboard lock up after sleep on Windows 10?

I’m not sure if this is due to the latest version of Windows 10 or not, but it started happening after the last update I got.  When my computer goes to sleep, sometimes when I wake it up I can’t enter anything from the keyboard.

I discovered that if I close my laptop and then re-open it, the keyboard starts working again.  Maybe this is just a coincidence, and it started happening because my laptop keyboard driver doesn’t recognize that my laptop has come out of sleep.  Or maybe it is something in the way the new Windows 10 version works.

If you lose the ability to enter from the keyboard, you can also temporarily gain control back by using the touch screen or by bringing up the virtual keyboard (the little keyboard symbol on the bottom right of the screen) with your mouse or pointing device.  In any case, rebooting (click on the start icon — bottom left of screen — and then the power icon just above it) should always restore the keyboard to normal operation.  If not, you may have additional issues to deal with.
Keyboard clip art

First human head transplant?

The Scientist reports that “Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero announced that the world’s first human head transplant…will take place in China sometime within the next 10 months…”  Apparently many experts are skeptical of Dr. Canavero’s proposed procedure .

Is this science fiction or reality?  It’s been a long time since “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley was published (1818).  I’m no expert of neurosurgery, so I can’t comment on the nature of the upcoming head transplant based on science.  But it does raise an issue which all of us can ponder.  Do we have a soul?

Let’s say for the sake of argument that Dr. Canavero is successful in transplanting a human severed head to another body.  Further, let’s say that the patient survives and is able to communicate what it feels like to be in a new body — same head, different body.  Is there any way to determine if this person’s soul transferred along with their head?

Even if the patient thought that they were the same person as before, how can we be sure that their soul came along for the ride?  Or if it did, was it 100% transferred or was part of it left in the operating room?  Or even if they had a soul to begin with.

I don’t know the appropriate tests or questions for the patient.  But if by chance this transplant is a success, experts in theology and psychology and associated fields should be considering what those tests and questions should be.  If not, we may not fully understand the extent of success or failure of a head transplant.  Sure, we can check the patient’s vitals and mental health, but who can check their soul?

My story “Face Facts” examines the mind of a person who has an operation to cure their inability to recognize faces.